Squire padlock and chain review

It’s not glamorous but this hefty chain and lock from Squire will help keep your bike safe

Squire padlock and chain

by Jim Blackstock |

It’s a sad fact of life that if you have something nice, someone else will always want it and this is particularly true when it comes to motorcycling. Theft of bikes is a very real problem and security has never been more important; security at home but more importantly, security when you are out and about on your bike.

Motorcycle security is best applied in layers, to make the bike as unattractive to thieves as possible and prevent the bike from being ridden away as well as being physically lifted and put in the back of a van to be driven away. That might sound extreme but it’s not – a handful of burly geezers can have most bikes in the back of a van.

Unless, of course, they are securely chained to something solid and immovable with a solid chain and padlock. Sure, the chain can be cut – anything is possible - but that takes time and draws attention to the act, which is generally the last thing that the thief wants.

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This lock and chain combination from renowned security expert Squire is a great addition to your security armoury. It is hefty enough to offer significant protection yet it is also portable enough so that you can take it with you to secure your bike when you are out and about.

The chain is 1500mm long, meaning it is long enough to go through a wheel on the bike and around something immovable to make sure the bike stays where you leave it. It’s heavyweight but isn’t overly heavy – the chain weighs in at 9kg so while it may be too heavy for many panniers, topboxes or rear racks – many of which specify a load limit of around 5-7kg – it will easily sit on the pillion seat-pad when secured properly.

It uses 16mm diameter-wire links that are formed in hardened alloy steel and these have started to show a little surface corrosion over the years, particularly when used extensively outside and where the links rub against each other.

However, this is purely surface and is no real cause for concern. The chain itself is wrapped in a PVC sheath so that it doesn’t damage paint or other finishes on the bike’s wheels when it is locked up.

Squire lock and chain in situ
©Photo: Bauer Media

The lock itself is a closed-shackle design, meaning that when it is locked shut, there is no real chance of attacking the shackle itself. This is formed in 10mm diameter hardened steel and the lock is a six-pin design, making it virtually impossible to pick.

The key barrel is protected by a rubber cover to prevent moisture from getting into the mechanism and it is supplied with three keys. Like the chain, the shackle has developed minor surface corrosion where it contacts the chain but this doesn’t affect its operation.

Verdict

A solid lock and chain is hardly the most desirable part of your riding kit but it is absolutely essential to help make sure that you keep your bike.

I have been using this combination for a couple of years, both at home and out and about and have had no problems whatsoever with confidence that the bike will be exactly where I left it.

Squire chain surface rust
©Photo: Bauer Media

It wraps around the pillion seat and grab-rails on most bikes and is there when you need it. Both the chain and the lock are Sold Secure Gold rated, meaning they withstand attack and offer both reassurance and physical protection.

Pros:

16mm link chain is long enough to wrap around most immovable objects

10mm shackle padlock with six-pin lock

Heavy enough for protection, light enough for portability

Cons:

Some surface rust developing

More security options:

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