Kappa WA402S rucksack review

If you want a no-frills rucksack to keep your gear dry, this is a great option

Kappa WA402S Rucksack

by Jim Blackstock |

There are various types of luggage available to motorcycle riders but in their most basic form, a product formed from PVC tarpaulin will stand the best chance of keeping your gear dry but also, shedding as much water as possible. The material itself is impervious to moisture, so nothing will get in and water should literally roll off it as soon as it hits.

As a result, even if you ride through a deluge, by the time you get to your destination, your luggage, while having water on the surface, won’t be soaked and take forever to dry. There’s also little worse than trudging through the reception of a hotel with saturated luggage that is dripping water as you go, knowing it will take hours to dry out ready for use again.

This rucksack from Kappa is just that; formed from PVC tarpaulin, the material will prevent any and all water from entering, ensuring that your contents stay safe and dry whatever the conditions.

Kappa WA402S Rucksack

It opens like a traditional rucksack, so there are no issues with loading your kit in and out of it from the top and it closes with a roll-top function, the ends of the rolled-up closure being fastened with straps on the side.

I know from experience that, like the material it is formed from, this will keep all water out and protect the contents, in the heaviest of rain and for as long as you can stand riding in it.

The bag has a total capacity of 30 litres in a single compartment with no pockets, sleeves or separate sections; just one huge compartment capable of taking anything from daily commuting requirements to enough kit for a weekend away – I know, as I’ve done it and I don’t travel particularly light.

I find the shoulder straps very comfortable (I prefer traditional rucksack straps to innovative fixings) and the waist belt, while itself not particularly thick, is fitted to wide hip pads which help support the weight of the bag when on the back.

The back section of the rucksack is nicely shaped to create channels for air to flow around the back, preventing it from getting too sweaty, assuming your back protector also allows your skin to breathe.

However, if this isn’t for you, then the shaped back padding can be removed – it is held on to the main body of the rucksack with Velcro, as is the waist belt, which can also be removed if you want. There is also a chest strap to prevent the shoulder straps from moving on the ride and spreading across your chest.

A single external pocket hides a helmet-carrying bag that remains fixed inside the pocket with one strap and then, fixes to the outside of the bag using four quick-release catches and straps.

This will house pretty much any helmet, though an adventure lid with a peak may get a little cumbersome and though designed to carry a lid when on the bike, I’m not sure I feel it’s secure enough to be doing that. It is bright orange though so would improve your visibility a lot.

Verdict

If you want a rucksack where the effort and spend have gone into comfort and waterproofing, then this is an excellent option. It is a basic, no-frills rucksack but it is easy to load through the large aperture and to get on thanks to the curved shoulder straps.

It’s also very comfortable once on, due to the shaped and padded back section and the wide waist belt. It takes a weekend’s clothing easily as well as your commuting essentials and will keep whatever is inside dry regardless of the conditions outside.

They are scarce now as they are no longer current but if you can find one, they are a great addition to your all-weather riding gear.

Pros:

Waterproof

Economical

Comfortable to wear

Cons:

Tricky to get hold of

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QBag Waterproof Rucksack
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